October 24, 2014

Source: KGTV

Source: KGTV

California medical board investigators have alleged that a physician working in a San Diego health clinic for uninsured and low-income individuals took illicit nude photos of patients. More than a dozen women have accused endocrinologist Dr. Jeffrey J. Abrams of misconduct, according to an attorney representing one of the victims.

Dr. Abram’s cellphone had 1,300 pictures, allegedly including many explicit photos of his patients, according to court documents. A patient who visited the Volunteers in Medicine medical clinic in El Cajon originally informed law enforcement that Abrams had inappropriately touched her and also took five photos of her. The clinic sees approximately 3,000 patients annually. Dr. Abrams has held his medical license since 1974 and has no reported medical malpractice claims or disciplinary actions.

The case follows the recent Washington, D.C.-area news that a prominent rabbi was accused of secretly filming women during bathing rituals. The Abrams case also bears disturbing similarity to that involving Johns Hopkins gynecologist Dr. Nikita Levy, who secretly recorded female patients. Like Dr. Abrams, Dr. Levy provided medical services to low-income and disadvantaged women and allegedly abused his position of authority.

A police search of Dr. Levy’s home revealed 10 computer servers containing thousands of explicit photos of his patients. Some of Dr. Levy’s patients said also made inappropriate remarks during medical examinations, touched them unnecessarily, and conducted needless physical exams. Like Dr. Abrams, police were tipped of about Dr. Levy’s allegedly inappropriate behavior.

David Haynes, the managing attorney of The Cochran Firm, D.C., is a member of the plaintiffs’ steering committee in the Johns Hopkins litigation and has extensive experience dealing with legal issues related to invasion of patient privacy by physicians. Johns Hopkins Hospital recently agreed to pay $190 million to the victims of Dr. Levy.