August 10, 2016

Hospital officials claim no link between bacterial infections and infant deaths

PG County hospital center bacteria outbreakThe Cochran Firm, D.C. is actively looking into what, if any, link exists between the unfortunate deaths of two infants at PG Hospital Center and the pseudomonas bacteria outbreak at the facility. The hospital has provided inadequate information about how and why the bacteria found its way into the NICU and why two children passed from the same unit away around the same time.

The Cochran Firm, D.C. has already been contacted by families affected by this tragedy and are working hard to get answers as to why this happened. To speak to an attorney from our office, call 208-682-5800 or fill out an online contact form.

Hospital bacteria infections at PG Hospital Center

Prince George’s Hospital Center recently transferred nine infants from its neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) after three children tested positive for a potentially fatal strain of bacteria. The move comes only a short time after two babies lost their lives in the NICU, their causes of death are still under investigation by the hospital.

Pseudomonas infections are caused by a common type of bacteria known as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. If the bacteria spreads to patients with weakened immune systems, serious infections can develop.

The nature of pseudomonas bacteria suggests the outbreak may be due to the hospital’s inability to adhere to the standard of care to only use sterilized water in the NICU. If the hospital was in fact negligent by failing to protect its vulnerable patients, victims and their families may be entitled to substantial compensation.

A spokesperson for PG Hospital Center acknowledged the strain of bacteria discovered in the NICU is “often found in water systems,” suggesting a likely source of contamination could be the hospital’s own plumbing. Testing is underway at the hospital to determine if pseudomonas bacteria is infact present in the facility’s tap water.

According to the Washington Post, standards of care for an NICU call for infants to only come in contact with sterile water to prevent bacterial infections. The Post’s reporting notes NICU bacterial outbreaks can occur when sterilized medical equipment is rinsed in ordinary tap water.

Maryland medical malpractice lawyers

If your child developed a bacterial infection while in the PG Hospital Center NICU, contact our office for a free legal consultation. You can fill out an online contact form or call our office during business hours at 202-682-5800 or at 1-800-THE FIRM (843-3476) to reach us 24 hours a day.

The Maryland medical malpractice lawyers of The Cochran Firm, D.C. work hand in hand with an in-house team that includes a registered nurse and investigators to help victims get the compensation they deserve.